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A Project Approach

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A typical ‘project’ includes a piece of literature that stimulates students’ thinking, a rich text that includes an open-ended problem to solve with multiple solutions, and a chart, called a KWC , which is used to pull out elements of the problem by asking three basic questions: 

1.  What do I Know for sure? 

2.  What do I need to find out?  

3.   Are there any special Conditions?

 Then a solution is worked out (4 X 6), followed by second solution (3 X 8 or 2 X 12), next a debriefing time or ‘math huddle’ with all the other small groups.  The final step is to reflect upon what has been learned by writing in each individual’s notebook.  Reading comprehension strategies are used throughout the project which braids mathematics, language and thinking tightly together.  Projects gathered from many sources are engaging to the students’ interest and are easily differentiated to meet the needs of all students’ ability. 

In and Out Function Machine: "Two of Everything"

Time: "Taking the Time to Teach Time"

Base Ten and Place Value: "The Candy Shoppe"

Estimation: "The Jelly Bean Jar" page 1

Estimation: "The Jelly Bean Jar" page 2

Money: "Are There Really 293 Ways to Make a Dollar?" page 1

Money: "Are There Really 293 Ways to Make a Dollar?" page 2

Multiplication Using Area: "Rectangles, Rectangles, and More Rectangles" page 1

Multiplication Using Area: "Rectangles, Rectangles, and More Rectangles" page 2

Multiplication Using Equal Groups:

"Horse Ranch" page 1

"Horse Ranch" page 2

"Hair Bows for Sale"

"American Red Cross"

"Treasure Map"

"Magnolia Bakery"